Professor David Olusoga OBE Image: University of Bedfordshire

Professor David Olusoga OBE is set to deliver a public lecture as part of the University of Bedfordshire’s celebrations for this year’s Black History Month.

This is a significant national event now widely recognised as an integral part of British culture and history.

The University said it is proud to host the historian, broadcaster and film-maker, Professor David Olusoga OBE, as he reveals the absence of Black history and Black role models in Britain’s education, and explores how Black Britons stamped their presence and their experiences on to the UK’s story over the past 50 years.

Taking place online on Wednesday 6 October 2021 at 5pm, the free-to-attend event, ‘Black & British with Professor David Olusoga’, is the University’s first ‘An Evening With’ guest lecture of the 2021-22 academic year.

Agenda:

17:00 – Welcome from Vice Chancellor and introduction of Professor David Olusoga

17:05 – Professor Olusoga’s lecture

17:35 – Q&A with Vice Chancellor

18:00 – Thank you and close

Hosted by Professor Rebecca Bunting, vice chancellor, the event is set to be of great interest to all those with an interest in Black British history, social and political history and the education system.

Ahead of the lecture, Professor Bunting said:

“We are excited to be hosting the upcoming public lecture with historian, Professor David Olusoga OBE.

“His work around Black British history and culture is inspirational and something we’re certain our students, staff and the public will admire.

“We are proud of Bedfordshire’s diverse student body and staff, and hope that this event with Professor Olusoga will offer our University community something positive to take away, think about and explore further.”

Professor Olusoga is a British-Nigerian historian, broadcaster and film-maker known for his BBC series, A House Through Time, and his contributions to the Oxford Companion to Black British History.

He was awarded an OBE in 2019 for services to history and community integration, and is a Professor of History at the University of Manchester.

Professor David Olusoga OBE said:

“Since its introduction into Britain in 1987, Black History Month has come of age.

“Thanks to the efforts of campaigners, historians, activists and teachers – often working at a local level – Black Britons have managed to inscribe their history back into our shared national story, overcoming centuries of selective amnesia.

“It is important we celebrate Black history but also that we recognise that making Black History Month into what it is today is in itself an enormous achievement.”

The event is free to attend but people should register online via Eventbrite.

Registered individuals will be sent instructions of how to join nearer the event date.