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Professor Clare Kelliher, Professor of Work and Organisation at Cranfield School of Management, has been conferred as a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Professor Kelliher is one of 75 prominent social science practitioners nominated and assessed by her peers as having made a distinguished contribution to the social sciences.

She was recognised for the excellence and impact of her work, as well as her wider contributions to the social sciences for public benefit.

Professor Kelliher’s specialist interests include the organisation of work and the management of the employment relationship in the context of organisational change.

She has a long-standing interest in flexible working, and is currently leading a research project looking at the impact of the flexible element of the furlough scheme during the COVID-19 pandemic on employer attitudes to part-time work going forwards.

Professor David Oglethorpe, Pro-Vice Chancellor and Dean of Cranfield School of Management, said:

“Our research into the changing world of work has perhaps never been more important than it is right now. As we emerge from the shadow of COVID-19 and employees and employers alike seek to re-negotiate what work, the workforce and the workplace will look like in the months and years to come.

“Clare’s expertise and impact in this area has always been highly valued here at Cranfield, and I am thrilled that it has been recognised externally with the awarding of this prestigious fellowship.

“The fact that the nomination and subsequent assessment was led by fellow leading social scientists gives it even more meaning.”

There are now some 1,450 recognised Academy of Social Sciences fellows from the academic, public, private and third sectors working around the world.

Will Hutton, President of the Academy of Social Sciences, said:

“As the Academy extends its outward-facing focus, engagement with all sectors of the social science community is vitally important, and I very much hope to draw on the deep knowledge and expertise of our new fellows.”